Clay Siegall and the Cancer Research

Clay Siegall, the Chief Executive Officer, President, and the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Seattle Genetics is an American citizen who focuses on making the lives of other citizens better. Clay Siegall went to the University of Maryland and obtained a Bachelor degree in Zoology, and later went to George Washington University for a P.H.D in genetics. It is with the academic background that he gained sound knowledge regarding genetics and health issues. He also focuses on helping people living with cancer.

In the year 1991, Clay Siegall joined Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research institution where he worked until 1997. He also worked with National Institute of Health between 1998 and 1991. Clay Siegall also worked for National Cancer Institute and is also one of the Board of Directors of Mirna Therapeutic and Alder Biopharmaceutical. Clay Siegall Got a lot of exposure into his career from the work experience he had got from the previous positions, and it’s from this that he became a professional doctor. Clay Siegall is also a well-known entrepreneur, and in 2012 he was awarded as the best entrepreneur of the year at Pacific Northwest.

Clay Siegall has contributed greatly to cancer awareness and treatment. He created cancer treatments using antibodies, and this is the reason why he decided to open his company. He made Seattle Genetic a great place where people would go whenever they are in need of trying any new medication. Dr. Clay always aims at offering more drugs to his patients and has also created a plan where he will provide over twelve new drugs to the community. Dr. Clay Siegall plans is to help people who are in need of a new cancer medication that only his company can provide. He hopes to save more people living with cancer as he is capable of helping.

OSI Food Group Now Owns A Tyson Food Plant

While Tyson Foods had to make a serious decision and close down one of their manufacturing plants, another food distributor has come in to buy the plant and bring back jobs to south Chicago. The shutting down of this plant was becoming inevitable as Tyson’s leaders said that this plant simply couldn’t keep up with the new customer demands that were hitting the marketplace.

When the plant changed ownership around 480 employees had been laid off, but OSI Group offered employment to all of those remaining the opportunity to stay with the company. OSI Group has stated acquiring this plant will help meet their own demands for increased production spaces.

OSI Group operates out of the greater Chicago area and is one of the world’s largest growing private companies in the food service sector. The company processes and treats meat taken from domestic livestock and has partnerships with various distribution companies by which they sell it to clients across the globe. They’ve acquired various Asian and European food distribution companies including Baho Food and one of the UK’s largest distributors, Flagship Europe. In most cases, OSI Group’s practice when acquiring companies has been to retain current leaders at the companies while increasing their supply chain and funding.

Related: OSI Group Acquires Baho Food to Expand Presence in Asia

OSI Group’s specialties have consisted of both raw and completely cooked meats. OSI Group helps customize meat packages for clients from breakfast meats such as bacon and sausages, to lunch meats and even complete sandwich specials, to pizzas and other entrees. OSI’s products are sold to both markets and wholesale distributors as well as privately-owned restaurants and public chains. OSI Group follows some of the strictest safety requirements to make sure its foods are healthy and edible for customers.

OSI Group has independent representatives that distribute their products at various locations around the world, all of whom are locals who understand culture and customer needs in each market. OSI Group has a team of executives led by Chairman and CEO Sheldon Lavin, and President and Chief Operating Officer David McDonald. OSI Group has sought to promote a family culture rather than the traditional corporate ladder leadership.