End Citizens United: Driving Money Out Of Elections

During elections in most countries, a lot of dirty money exchanges hands, and it cannot be traced from its source. While a number of funds used to fund elections vary from country to country depending on the type of donors and their political goodwill. The impact of such funding is always felt in the economy whereby the donors control most aspects of the economy. In America, this is also the case. It is due to this reason that the American public united to form the End Citizen United to challenge the federal laws that govern fundraising and donations towards campaigns.

In the infamous 2010, ruling by the Supreme Court, the judges ruled in favor of the federal government whereby they upheld that legally corporations are people and they can support any candidate they wish to. Despite the fact that the decision didn’t lie well with the American citizens especially the Democrats it, however, didn’t stop their ambition of condemning the federal election laws.

With established grassroots support, End Citizens United was started in March 2015 in reaction to the 2010 decision by the Supreme Court. It is headed by Tiffany Muller who is the CEO and President. Citizens United was founded as Political Action Committee with the purpose of advocating for financial reforms.

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With the intent of driving a lot of money out of politics, the group has found itself making more money than it expected. In the first quarter of this year alone the group collected $4 million, and it projects to collect an estimated amount of $35 million to cater for the Congressional midterm elections which will be held in 2018. This will be a significant increase in collections as compared to the $25 million which was collected for the 2016 elections which were the group’s first election cycle since it was formed in 2015. End Citizen United does not accept donations from any particular individual exceeding $5,000.

According to Tiffany Muller, the group’s President, over hundred thousand people contributed during this year’s first three months, of which forty thousand were contributing for the first time. This shows the tremendous progress the group is making towards achieving its goals. According to the group’s leaders, their main goal is to elect leaders who are financing reformist into Congress. On average the group received contributions worthy $12 million for this year.

During the recent special elections for suburban Atlanta, held on April 18, the group urged its members to raise $500,000 to help towards the campaign of Jon Ossof who was vying for the first time. Jon, who is 30 and a reformist, had surprised many by raising over $4 million on his own towards his campaigns. The seat was left vacant by Tom Price who was appointed as the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

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